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E/R: Regional Hospital To Organize “Free Cataract Screening“ On Monday

Eastern Regional Hospital in Koforidua has set Monday September 17, 2018 to formerly launch free cataract screening day to be continued for some days.

September 14, 2018

As part of measures to detect and treat cataract to eliminate blindness, the Eastern Regional Hospital in Koforidua has set Monday September 17, 2018 to formerly launch free cataract screening day to be continued for some days.

Head of the Eye Care Unit of the Ghana Health Service (GHS), Dr James Addy, who revealed this appealed to the public to participate in the exercise to screen their eyes for appropriate treatment either through surgery or medication for free and would not discriminate against persons without the National Health Insurance Scheme.

Dr Addy explained that to be able to prevent people from getting blind from cataract in the country, they would need to conduct 40,000 cataract surgeries annually above the current figure of 15,000 surgeries.

A cataract is a clouding of the normally clear lens of your eye. For people who have cataracts, seeing through cloudy lenses is a bit like looking through a frosty or fogged-up window. Clouded vision caused by cataracts can make it more difficult to read, drive a car (especially at night) or see the expression on a friend’s face.

Most cataracts develop slowly and don’t disturb your eyesight early on. But with time, cataracts will eventually interfere with your vision.

At first, stronger lighting and eyeglasses can help you deal with cataracts. But if impaired vision interferes with your usual activities, you might need cataract surgery. Fortunately, cataract surgery is generally a safe, effective procedure.

Cataract is the leading cause of blindness, recording 50 per cent of the disease among Ghanaians and about 46,000 persons suffer from blindness annually in Ghana and only 16,000 of them are treated with the rest becoming unproductive after becoming blind.

About 75 per cent of blindness could have been treated or prevented if the affected persons had attended hospitals with eye care facilities and 16 per cent of children in the Region in 2000 suffered from trachoma, another eye disease, and less than three per cent of them were treated and 1,500 yet to receive treatment.

Also, about 600,000 Ghanaians were suffering from the disease, placing Ghana as the number two in the world and 8,000 children suffer from trachoma annually in the country while measles, which was a leading cause of blindness among children, had reduced due to immunization.

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