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A 17-year-old student represents Brazil at the Young Science Nobel Prize in Sweden with a water quality monitoring project |  Piaoui

A 17-year-old student represents Brazil at the Young Science Nobel Prize in Sweden with a water quality monitoring project | Piaoui

Piaoi represents Brazil at the Nobel Prize for Young Science in Sweden

Hey Student Manuel Jose Nunes Neto, 17 years oldHe will represent Brazil in Nobel Prize for Young Science In Sweden in August this year with the project “Water rover Autonomous water quality monitoring: a low-cost portable instrument“.

Emmanuel Ho Project Water roverWhat Evaluates issues such as pH, temperature, turbidity and oxygen in the wateran offer Important data so that public bodies can, for example, develop policies Which are essential to maintaining water control and quality.

In Emmanuel's own words:

Stockholm Youth Water Prize 2024

A 17-year-old student will represent Brazil at the Nobel Young Science Prize in Sweden with a water quality monitoring project – Image: Disclosure

The student went to Parque da Cidagna, in the center of Teresina, to explain how this object worked (Video above).

The prototype was chosen to represent the country in Stockholm Youth Water Prize 2024 (Stockholm Junior Water Prize – SJWP), and Nobel Prize for Young Science, in Sweden, which takes place in August. He will compete with students from 40 other countries.

The competition will be online, through public voting. So the student started a campaign in Your social network To get votes. If it depends on the boy's mother, the prize is already guaranteed:

“I can't explain how I feel. When the voting link appears, let's vote, vote a lot, because there are a lot of votes, at least 56,000 votes. There are 41 countries that will compete. The winner is the country,” Francinalda Souza, Manuel's mother, said proudly. Which received the largest number of votes and the country that participated most in this award.”

A 17-year-old student will represent Brazil at the Nobel Prize for Emerging Science in Sweden with a water quality monitoring project – Image: Reproduction

The Yanomamis suffered from mercury contamination

The researchers collected hair samples – Photo: Fiocruz/Disclosure

The study collected hair samples from 287 indigenous people from the Ninam subgroup, the Yanomami people, and revealed that Indigenous people living in villages closest to illegal mining have the highest levels of mercury exposure.

The communities that participated in the research are located on the banks of the Mokagai River, one of the communities most affected by illegal mining on Yanomami land. It is located in the Amazonas and Roraima region It is home to 31,000 indigenous people living in 370 communities.

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