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HomescienceA child who received a brain implant to control epilepsy is progressing...

A child who received a brain implant to control epilepsy is progressing favorably

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Thirteen-year-old Oran was the first person to receive a brain transplant to control seizures and seizures. Since the intervention, crises have decreased by 80%, which has had a significant impact on her quality of life.

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Oran Knowlson, 13, has suffered from a rare form of epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut, for about ten years. This is a syndrome that causes regular seizures – in Oran's case, they occurred from 20 to hundreds a day – and learning difficulties.

In October 2023, the boy became a leader in the CADET project, a trial of deep brain stimulation for children with epilepsy. Since then, his seizures have decreased by 80%, which has had a significant impact on his quality of life.

In an operation that took about eight hours at Great Ormond Street Hospital, a neurostimulation device was installed that sends electrical signals deep into the brain. the brain, thus reducing seizures.

Epileptic seizures are caused by abnormal bursts of electrical activity in the brain, and the role of this device is to prevent or interrupt these abnormal manifestations.

“For Oran and his family, epilepsy has completely changed their lives, so seeing him on a horse and regaining his independence is absolutely amazing. We couldn't be happier to be part of his journey.”Martin Tisdale, a pediatric neurosurgeon, said months after the surgical success.

Hope has already returned to the Knowlson family, who feel the improvement in Oran. “The future looks promising, something I couldn’t even dream of saying six months ago. For Oran, hope brings enthusiasm. It makes the future brighter and more achievable.”says mother Justine.

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He was also diagnosed with autism and attention deficit disorder, and it was the epileptic seizures that robbed Oran of his greater independence and quality of life. “I feel like I'm getting my son back little by little. It's going to take some time, but for the first time in ten years, we have hope.”Justine added.

Three more children will soon take part in the UK trial, which experts have described as a pilot “Agent of change”.

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