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After half a million electric cars, Norway has concluded that they are more reliable than thermal cars

After half a million electric cars, Norway has concluded that they are more reliable than thermal cars

With more than half a million electric cars on the road, Norway concluded in a report that they are more reliable than thermal models.


Norway is an example when it comes to the electric transition. After all, as we've seen here, the country already has a sales share of over 80%, with more than half a million electric cars on the country's roads.

In fact, it is one of the only countries that provides an ideal scenario for studying the mass adoption of these models.

So, Norwegian Automobile Federation The reasons for calling assistance services to help the electric car are detailed in the report.

Among the various conclusions, the most important ones stand out: practically none of them stops due to lack of charge, and they are more reliable than cars with internal combustion engines.

Norway collected data and concluded that electric cars are more reliable

Of the 143,000 departures carried out by these services in the first half of 2022, there were just over seven thousand electric models involved.

Furthermore, a traction battery running out of juice isn't among the five most common reasons an electric vehicle owner needs roadside assistance.

In contrast, the main reason is a lack of charge in the 12-volt starting battery – also found in thermal and hybrid cars.

According to the Norwegian Automobile Association's report, 54% of services were due to this problem, while 4.4% were related to defects in the car's propulsion system.

secondly, a report He mentions the holes, which may be caused by the fact that electric cars are heavier on average. Then there are electrical system malfunctions (third), followed by snow jams (fourth) and suspension problems (fifth).

Electric cars rarely catch fire, much less often than petrol and diesel cars. We also note that when the electrical part burns out, it rarely affects the battery.

A few months ago, Kjetil Solberg, from the Norwegian Civil Protection Directorate, took part in dispelling the alleged myth that electric cars are more prone to catching fire.

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The data contained in the Norwegian report may also be surprising, because it does not meet expectations.