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Coffee helps reduce the risk of dementia;  Find out the ideal amount

Coffee helps reduce the risk of dementia; Find out the ideal amount

Credits: Brazil Images / istock

Antioxidants and caffeine, as well as phenols and other bioactive compounds found in coffee, have a protective effect on the brain and reduce the risk of dementia – iStock/Getty Images

Researchers said that drinking two to three cups of coffee daily reduces the risk of dementia or stroke School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical UniversityIn China.

The study that examined the relationship between coffee and human health brainHe estimated that the same applies to three to five cups of tea or a mixture of four to six cups of both drinks.

“We found that coffee and tea consumption, alone or in combination, is associated with a lower risk of stroke and dementia,” the researchers wrote.

Positive effects of coffee:

  • Drinking two to three cups of coffee and two to three cups of tea daily reduces the risk of dementia by 28%.
  • The risk of stroke decreases by 32% when drinking the same amount of coffee and tea.
  • The findings apply to stroke, dementia, and vascular dementia, but not to Alzheimer's disease, the study authors point out.

Why does coffee reduce the risk of dementia?

Scientists evaluated data from a long-term British study conducted by UK Biobank. About 370,000 people between the ages of 50 and 74 were monitored over 14 years.

For experts, some components found in coffee, such as antioxidants and caffeine, as well as phenols and other bioactive compounds, have a protective effect on the brain and neurons and prevent memory loss in old age. Likewise, tea, which also contains caffeine and flavonoids, has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

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Despite these findings, the study authors believe that more research is needed: “Our results show a link between moderate consumption of coffee and tea and the risk of stroke and dementia. However, it remains to be determined whether providing such information can improve Stroke and dementia outcomes.