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Labor is in a stable side position.  This does not mean that there is peace and quiet in the party - Dagsavisen

Labor is in a stable side position. This does not mean that there is peace and quiet in the party – Dagsavisen

Almost all of the promises in the 100 Day Plan were fulfilled by the deadline. The energy crunch was met with a custom package. The beer taps opened again, and several inscriptions were announced in Corona’s measures. Wage support and vacation pay for laid-offs. In practical life policy, measures are pumped in at a rapid pace.

However, things are deteriorating for the Labor Party: except for the opinion polls. There is a very steep slope. on a modern scale The working volume is only twice the size of the red one. The Center Party has become the new Norwegian champion in diving. This is a historically bad start for a new government.

For the prime minister and party leader, daily political life is characterized by enormous tension. At one extreme are the great global questions of war and peace, the future of the planet, global economic growth and collapse, and the international power game.

There Jonas Gahr Støre excels. This week he was in New York and chaired the United Nations Security Council. he interviewed By Christiane Amanpour, CNN journalist on the situation in Ukraine. And most of all: he had a spontaneous meeting with Joe Biden at the White House. If the Labor Party had promised in its Hundred-Day Plan that Storre would sit with the President of the United States by the fireplace in the Oval Office by the end of January, they would have been fired for good reason. But this has already happened.

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At the other end, we find the small domestic issues. boycott decisions, eg. As strange as it may sound, Ukraine is not necessarily more important than the Gulf. The dispute over county boundaries in eastern Norway could mean more to the future of the APS than an armed border conflict on European soil. The vague indifference suggests that Jonas Gahr Stoer does not fully understand this. He probably doesn’t care much about this.

One thing is emerging as an increasingly clear goal. Tonje Brenna will join the leadership of the Labor Party

The maneuvers at Akershus became even more impressive. Education Minister Tonji Brenna and Foreign Minister Anneken Heitfeldt opposed their government, their party, a number of local groups and the majority of Akershus municipalities by opposing the large boycott dissolution. Even their ally, Foreign Minister Halvard Ingbrigtsen, opposed the local team he leads himself, the Lørenskog Ap. All representatives of the Labor Party’s municipal council in Lørenskog voted against a motion to preserve Viken, and two-thirds of them voted in favor of dissolution. However, Ingebrigtsen participated in the Akershus Ap’s unanimous board of directors’ decision to retain Viken. This is not how respect for grassroots rules and local democracy looks.

What happens in Viken does not stay in Viken. If the thriller ends with a major boycott at Saturday’s Meeting of Destiny within a week, the balance of power in the Labor Party could be seriously upset. The Akershus Ap administration has alliances with several other large counties: Minister of Petroleum and Energy Marte Mjøs Persen in Vestland, Storting representative Cecilie Myrseth in Troms and Central Board member Tore O. Sandvik in Trøndelag are key players. Most provinces are uncountable mosquitoes compared to this powerful mastodon, which is largely based on the old network of outgoing deputy Trond Geske.

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One thing is emerging as an increasingly clear goal. Tonje Brenna will join the Labor Party leadership. Perhaps at the next national meeting, in the spring of 2023. From there, she could grow even more and become the current heiress after Støre. Speculations about this are getting closer and closer.

But who will come out?

“Now I think it’s starting to go so wrong that you have to knock on the table and put it in place. Get the Tajiks out. Damn, I’m sick. The line is from the wonderful documentary “Power Reigns” about the downfall of Trondjesek, which will be shown in cinemas In March a local supporter of the Labor Party Hommelvik in Trøndelag gives Giske a clear message. This is not a random single case. In the winter of 2019, concrete attempts were made to impeach Ms. Hadia Tajik, as part of the Nominating Committee’s preparations for the national meeting in the spring of that year. They have not yet succeeded that.

There is no indication that the Tajiks will be used as a circular buoy.

When Jeske’s case was at its worst, she thought about getting involved in politics, I recently told Dagsavisen. But that was four years ago. Now, most evidence suggests that anyone who thinks it would be easy to remove a Tajik is underestimating them entirely. There are no indications that it will be used as a circular buoy. “I thought for some time that I was visiting Norwegian politics and trust positions are something you can borrow from. (…) Now I want to be in politics for a long time,” she said in the same interview, which was published on New Year’s Eve. It can hardly be said more clearly.

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Previously, it was speculated that Tonje Brenna could become a party secretary by striking a barter deal with Kjersti Stenseng, who had been an important supporter of her for a long time. It is also worth noting that at no time did Stenseng attempt to prevent Akershus from violating party policy in the Viken affair. exactly the contrary.

The third possibility is that Bjornar Skiran should give way. He took over as deputy leader when Trond esk resigned, and as Minister for Fisheries and Maritime Affairs, he was not given a central position in the government, despite his presence in the party leadership.

One thing is for sure: Viken’s big weekend next Saturday isn’t the beginning of the end. It’s not even the end of the beginning. It is a continuation of a long, difficult and exciting battle over what kind of party will be Labor until 2030, and who will lead it.

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