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Presidentkandidat Ferdinand Marcos står med armene hevet. Han står på en scene med en mikrofon foran seg. Han har på rød t-skjorte, bak ham er det en stor skjerm, også farget rødt. Et stort bilde av ham som smiler fyller deler av skjermen.

The dictator’s son leads with more than 16 million votes – NRK Urix – Foreign News & Documentaries

More than 67 million Filipinos are set to decide on Monday who will take over the country’s presidency.

On Tuesday, it appears that the son of former dictator Ferdinand Marcos, Ferdinand Marcos Jr., will win more than 16 million votes.

Marcus is said to have received around 30 million votes. His strongest opponent, Lenny Robredo, is said to have received no more than 14 million votes. He writes CNN.

These numbers have not been officially confirmed. It may take several weeks.

The son of dictator Ferdinand Marcos, Jr. It now appears ready to win the presidential election in the Philippines. Pictured here after he cast his vote earlier on Monday.

Photo: JAM STA ROSA / AFP

Ferdinand Marcos Sr. had to resign from the presidency 36 years ago. The family has not been in power since then.

If the primary election results are up, it appears Marcus Jr. Once again the political dynasty enters the presidential palace.

Troubled family history

In the Philippines, the Marcos family was previously known for human rights abuses and corruption.

Democratic rights were severely weakened under Marcus Sr., who also used to provide himself and his family from the state treasury.

His wife, Imelda Marcos, for example, was the owner of more than 3,000 pairs of designer shoes. The shoe collection was found when the family had to flee the presidential palace in 1986. It later became a symbol of the family’s wealth and the absence of democratic rule.

Many pairs of shoes were later housed in the National Museum in Manila.

A curator displays a pair of red high-heeled shoes at the National Museum in Manila, the capital of the Philippines.  Along the wall to the left are several pairs of buckets in a row.  They all belong to the former First Lady, Imelda Marcos.  And behind the curator, who is on the right in the photo, several shoes are placed on the shelves, and a painted picture of Imelda hangs on the wall.

Parts of Imelda Marcos’ huge shoe collection have been on display in recent years at the National Museum in Manila. Here is a little 2012.

Photo: Bullit Marquez/Ap

Marcus Jr. has worked hard to change people’s impression of family. At the same time, he refused to apologize for his father’s actions as president.

Marcos and his social media campaign took serious measures to wash down the family’s name and history, Agence France-Presse writes.

Six years with Duterte

In recent years, Rodrigo Duterte has ruled the island nation with an iron fist.

His daughter Sarah ran for vice president for Marcos. She also seems to have won the elections by a good margin.

Sarah Duterte stands against a green and pink colored background.  She stands with her right hand raised with a fist.  She has her hair in a side parting and gathered at the back.  She is wearing a light beige blouse and is smiling.

Sarah Duterte, daughter of President Rodrigo Duterte, is running for Vice President Ferdinand Marcos Jr.

Photo: Aaron Favila/AP

Duterte became world famous for his extremely strict drug policy. During his presidency, his government executed thousands of drug addicts.

During his election campaign, Duterte promised to kill all criminals in the country. Even those who were involved in drug offenses thus had to pay with their lives.

He also called the Pope a “child whore” and joked that he would have liked to have been involved when an Australian missionary was raped and murdered in the country.

pink discount

Lenny Robredo was the strongest opponent of Marcos and Duterte. She wrote that she led the “Rose Revolution” in the country BBC. Robredo has served as Duterte’s vice president for the past six years.

She had one goal of her campaign: to prevent the Marco family from regaining power.

Robredo, the only presidential candidate, garnered widespread support among younger voters. It is also supported by many celebrities in the country.

Now it seems that Robredo should consider the battle lost.

Presidential candidate Lenny Robredo poses in a pink dress on stage.  The background is black.  Smiling at a blonde-haired woman holding a microphone and talking.  Lenny holds a small bouquet of tall pink flowers.  She has black hair and smiles.

Leni Robredo was Rodrigo Duterte’s vice president, but she was fired in 2019. Now she wants to become the country’s president.

Photo: Lisa Marie David/Reuters

people are protesting

Many Filipinos celebrated the initial election result on Tuesday, but it was also met with strong opposition.

On Tuesday, mass demonstrations took place outside the offices of the Electoral Commission in the capital, Manila.

Photo of people demonstrating in the Philippines.  In the foreground we see policemen, pictured from behind, in blue helmets and black protective suits.  In front of them, in the back of the photo, is a large crowd with many posters and flags.

Many Filipinos showed up in the capital, Manila, on Tuesday morning to protest against the preliminary election results.

Photo: Ted Eljeb/AFP

There was great enthusiasm about the elections. Even before polling stations opened on Monday morning, there were reports of shootings and grenade attacks at several polling stations.

So far, no such incidents were reported on Tuesday.

Four people were confirmed killed on Monday. The four were said to have been killed in shootings at two different polling stations on the island of Mindanao.

The deceased must have three guards and one civilian. The police and the army were stationed in a number of polling stations in the island state.

People stand in line, huddled, close to voting on Election Day in the Philippines on Monday, May 9.  The picture shows the faces of many of them in masks and three or four umbrellas among the waiting.

More than 67 million eligible people live in the Philippines. Here in line outside a polling station in the capital, Manila.

Photo: Aaron Favila/AP

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